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Dominic Reisig

Associate Professor & Extension Specialist

Publications

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Grants

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/25
Amount: $120,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Farm Bill. We will be assessing dispersal capacity and associative mating factors for Helicoverpa zea.

Date: 10/01/21 - 9/30/24
Amount: $300,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Genetically modified crops incorporating Bt traits targeting insect pests are widely adopted in the US, but they are now threatened by the evolution of resistance. The only method growers can use to delay resistance is to plant non-Bt refuges. However, even though this is legally required in the southern US, grower compliance is very low since it is a common pool resource. Past efforts to boost refuge compliance have failed, with a few limitations, including appeals to emotion and a moral suasion campaign. Based on past experimental evidence, we hypothesize that refuge compliance is higher among growers with a higher proportion of conditional cooperators and that conditional cooperation is a potential solution to delay the evolution of resistance to Bt for US growers. Our objectives are to: 1) measure conditional cooperation to identify groups with high and low conditional cooperation with North Carolina corn growers; 2) target extension efforts on refuge and resistance management at areas with high conditional cooperation in another domain; and 3) measure the outcome of refuge planting in the treatment areas. We will combine elements of moral suasion and appeals to emotion to facilitate cooperation and increase refuge compliance across the southern US.

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/24
Amount: $325,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The objectives of this project are to 1. train county agents on corn agronomy and corn pests 2. quantify the cost difference in growing non-Bt and Bt corn and 3. increase plantings of refuge (non-Bt) corn.

Date: 04/01/18 - 12/31/23
Amount: $5,000.00
Funding Agencies: Bayer Cropscience (formerly Aventis Crop Science)

Investigator will direct establishment and conduct of trial described in protocol. Investigator will direct collection and reporting of data as outlined in protocol and handle any disposition of trial materials necessary.

Date: 04/01/22 - 12/31/23
Amount: $35,000.00
Funding Agencies: Bayer Cropscience (formerly Aventis Crop Science)

Investigator will direct establishment and conduct of trial described in protocol. Investigator will direct collection and reporting of data as outlined in protocol and handle any disposition of trial materials necessary.

Date: 09/15/20 - 9/14/23
Amount: $324,997.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Brown stink bug, Euschistus servus, is the costliest and most problematic insect pest of corn in the southeastern US, and a major pest of soybean and cotton across the southeastern US and Midsouth. Our objectives are to 1. Measure stink bug populations in suitable host crops during the autumn where corn will be planted during the spring 2. Characterize overwintering habitats based on the categorization of host plants or forest structure 3. Measure brown stink bug colonization into spring corn adjacent to non-crop overwintering habitats and annual crops. 4. Estimate stink bug injury in focal corn fields 5. Assess corn yields relative to stink bug density and landscape features 6. Identify landscapes at risk for infestation by brown stink bug and create a risk map for the southeastern US 7. Document baselines for management of brown stink bug in field crops and disseminate brown stink bug risk management recommendation to relevant stakeholders

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/23
Amount: $330,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

This is an Extension Implementation Project (EIP). Our Program Priority Areas are IPM Implementation in: Agronomic Crops (28%), Communities (40%), Specialty Crops (24%), and Pollinator Health (8%). The person who will be responsible for grant coordination and budget management, and participation in the SERA3 meetings is Dr. Danesha Seth Carley, Director for the NSF Center for IPM and the Administrative contact is Dr. Rich Bonanno, Director of NC State Extension, and Associate Dean College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Through NC Cooperative Extension programs and diverse transdisciplinary team collaboration, we work to sustain and enhance environmental stewardship, reduce economic risks for growers and consumers, and protect human health by applying integrated pest management (IPM) in all suitable situations. Our goal is to increase coordination and improve efficiency of translating IPM research to the scientific community and stakeholders; as well as the residents of NC through extension and outreach programs. By working to synergize efforts and leverage resources, we are better able to promote development and adoption of IPM through collaborative programs and broad-based stakeholder participation. With a strong team of experts and close association with our Evaluation Specialist, we are able to document the value of IPM strategies and programs, and provide comprehensive success stories of IPM integration across NC. Through the outputs and outcomes from this program, NC Extension agents and stakeholders will become more knowledgeable about IPM and develop the skills necessary to implement IPM strategies in Agronomic Crops, Specialty Crops, Pollinator Health, and IPM in the Communities.

Date: 02/01/22 - 1/31/23
Amount: $45,000.00
Funding Agencies: Corn Growers Association of NC, Inc.

Support for yield data relevant to entomology will be helpful.

Date: 02/01/21 - 1/31/23
Amount: $39,840.00
Funding Agencies: NC Soybean Producers Association, Inc.

Early maturing soybean varieties have several potential benefits for growers in North Carolina, including earlier harvest and increased yield, as well as potential disease and nematode resistance traits that may not be available in later maturing varieties. Managing early maturing varieties may be difficult as environmental conditions and pest pressure in North Carolina differs from regions where these varieties were developed. Objectives of this project aim to: 1. Gain a robust understanding of already observed soybean seed quality issues through a comprehensive survey of impacted producers and County Extension Agents. 2. Investigate the impact of pest management on minimizing soybean seed quality issues encountered in NC. 3. Determine the role stink bugs play in synergizing encountered soybean seed quality issues. 4. Amplify extension outreach to minimize soybean seed quality issues and narrow the NC soybean yield gap through successful production of earlier maturing varieties.

Date: 02/01/21 - 1/31/23
Amount: $83,331.00
Funding Agencies: NC Soybean Producers Association, Inc.

Unmanned Aircraft (drones) are marketed in the agricultural sector as a ‘revolutionary’ technology. Although the technology and corresponding data are truly unique, the application of data outputs for agricultural management decisions (e.g., re-plant, pest management) remain unclear. This interdisciplinary project will investigate the use of drones in five key production areas 1) re-plant decisions, 2) incidence of fungal disease, 3) severity of insect-related defoliation, 4) weed identification and management, and 5) nutrient deficiencies. The project will evaluate common commercial drone technology to document baseline potential for decision support in soybean. The information generated by this project will be used to provide robust training to County Extension Agents and farmers across North Carolina on the use of these technologies to enhance profitability.


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