Skip to main content

Dominic Reisig

Associate Professor & Extension Specialist

Publications

View all publications 

Grants

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/25
Amount: $120,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Farm Bill. We will be assessing dispersal capacity and associative mating factors for Helicoverpa zea.

Date: 10/01/21 - 9/30/24
Amount: $300,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Genetically modified crops incorporating Bt traits targeting insect pests are widely adopted in the US, but they are now threatened by the evolution of resistance. The only method growers can use to delay resistance is to plant non-Bt refuges. However, even though this is legally required in the southern US, grower compliance is very low since it is a common pool resource. Past efforts to boost refuge compliance have failed, with a few limitations, including appeals to emotion and a moral suasion campaign. Based on past experimental evidence, we hypothesize that refuge compliance is higher among growers with a higher proportion of conditional cooperators and that conditional cooperation is a potential solution to delay the evolution of resistance to Bt for US growers. Our objectives are to: 1) measure conditional cooperation to identify groups with high and low conditional cooperation with North Carolina corn growers; 2) target extension efforts on refuge and resistance management at areas with high conditional cooperation in another domain; and 3) measure the outcome of refuge planting in the treatment areas. We will combine elements of moral suasion and appeals to emotion to facilitate cooperation and increase refuge compliance across the southern US.

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/24
Amount: $325,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The objectives of this project are to 1. train county agents on corn agronomy and corn pests 2. quantify the cost difference in growing non-Bt and Bt corn and 3. increase plantings of refuge (non-Bt) corn.

Date: 04/01/18 - 12/31/23
Amount: $5,000.00
Funding Agencies: Bayer Cropscience (formerly Aventis Crop Science)

Investigator will direct establishment and conduct of trial described in protocol. Investigator will direct collection and reporting of data as outlined in protocol and handle any disposition of trial materials necessary.

Date: 09/15/20 - 9/14/23
Amount: $324,997.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Brown stink bug, Euschistus servus, is the costliest and most problematic insect pest of corn in the southeastern US, and a major pest of soybean and cotton across the southeastern US and Midsouth. Our objectives are to 1. Measure stink bug populations in suitable host crops during the autumn where corn will be planted during the spring 2. Characterize overwintering habitats based on the categorization of host plants or forest structure 3. Measure brown stink bug colonization into spring corn adjacent to non-crop overwintering habitats and annual crops. 4. Estimate stink bug injury in focal corn fields 5. Assess corn yields relative to stink bug density and landscape features 6. Identify landscapes at risk for infestation by brown stink bug and create a risk map for the southeastern US 7. Document baselines for management of brown stink bug in field crops and disseminate brown stink bug risk management recommendation to relevant stakeholders

Date: 02/01/20 - 1/31/23
Amount: $120,000.00
Funding Agencies: Agricultural Biotechnology Stewardship Council (ABSTC)

Helicoverpa zea is one of the most important crop pests in the United States managed both with crops expressing Bt toxins and foliar insecticides. Because of resistance concerns, and practical resistance to Bt (Cry) toxins, a 2018 EPA Scientific Advisory Panel recommended the promotion of IPM strategies including post-harvest stalk and volunteer plant destruction, among others, to help delay resistance. The focus of this proposal is to 1) determine the effects of soil texture on overwintering survival of H. zea; 2) determine the horizontal distance of H. zea pupae from cotton and soybean stems to the row middle (to see if zone tillage can be effective); 3) evaluate the effects of tillage on overwintering survival of H. zea ; 4) evaluate the effect of a cover crop on overwintering survival of H. zea; and 5) calculate the net present value of tillage and a cover crop on H. zea populations and yield for North Carolina row crop growers, as well as the impact on soil quality. Hence, we will ensure that cultural practices to manage H. zea will not be developed at the expense of soil quality. Furthermore, our USDA NIFA BRAG #2018-02689 will describe the contribution of known Bt resistance alleles from overwintering H. zea overwintering in both cotton and soybeans (the most important crops to overwintering). Therefore, this proposal has the added benefit of analyzing the impact of tillage and a cover crop on both H. zea overwintering populations and Bt resistance allele frequencies.

Date: 09/15/16 - 9/14/22
Amount: $117,632.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS)

The outbreak of the sugarcane aphid on sorghum has caused severe economic losses in grain, forage and sweet sorghum production. The objectives of this project are: 1) to monitor seasonal changes of sugarcane aphid populations in sorghum and host grasses throughout the year to provide data to validate synoptic model for sugarcane aphid migration and to define geographic overwintering potential; and 2) to integrate all existing management tactics to provide both short-term and long-term solutions for growers, which includes identifying the best commercial hybrids available, effective insecticides, and maximize the potential of using natural enemies (i.e., predators, parasitoids, and pathogens) for explosive aphid population growth.

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/22
Amount: $165,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

This is an Extension Implementation Project (EIP). Our Program Priority Areas are IPM Implementation in: Agronomic Crops (28%), Communities (40%), Specialty Crops (24%), and Pollinator Health (8%). The person who will be responsible for grant coordination and budget management, and participation in the SERA3 meetings is Dr. Danesha Seth Carley, Director for the NSF Center for IPM and the Administrative contact is Dr. Rich Bonanno, Director of NC State Extension, and Associate Dean College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Through NC Cooperative Extension programs and diverse transdisciplinary team collaboration, we work to sustain and enhance environmental stewardship, reduce economic risks for growers and consumers, and protect human health by applying integrated pest management (IPM) in all suitable situations. Our goal is to increase coordination and improve efficiency of translating IPM research to the scientific community and stakeholders; as well as the residents of NC through extension and outreach programs. By working to synergize efforts and leverage resources, we are better able to promote development and adoption of IPM through collaborative programs and broad-based stakeholder participation. With a strong team of experts and close association with our Evaluation Specialist, we are able to document the value of IPM strategies and programs, and provide comprehensive success stories of IPM integration across NC. Through the outputs and outcomes from this program, NC Extension agents and stakeholders will become more knowledgeable about IPM and develop the skills necessary to implement IPM strategies in Agronomic Crops, Specialty Crops, Pollinator Health, and IPM in the Communities.

Date: 09/01/17 - 8/31/22
Amount: $1,123,775.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Through North Carolina (NC) Cooperative Extension programs and diverse cross-disciplinary team collaboration, we work to sustain and enhance environmental stewardship, reduce economic risks for growers and consumers, and protect human health by applying integrated pest management (IPM) in all appropriate settings, and to increase coordination and improve efficiency of translating IPM research through extension programming. By working to synergize efforts and leverage resources, we are better able to promote development and adoption of IPM through collaborative programs and broad-based stakeholder participation. With a strong team of experts and close association with our Evaluation Specialist, we are able to document the value of IPM strategies and programs, and demonstrate to our stakeholders that IPM works. Through the outputs and outcomes from this program, NC Extension agents and stakeholders will become more knowledgeable about IPM and develop the skills necessary to implement IPM strategies and build adoption of IPM in Agronomic Crops, Specialty Crops, Communities, and Pollinator Health. To accomplish our goals and address stakeholder needs for the 2017 CPPM-EIP program, we have 3 main objectives which we will tackle as specific program teams. These include 1) To develop and employ Extension Agent Trainings/In-Services to help agents to be effective communicators of IPM tactics, to build confidence in their knowledge of IPM strategies, and to foster high levels of trust and credibility in their local communities in Agronomic crops, Specialty crops, Communities, and/or Aquatic environments; 2) Deliver IPM Information to stakeholders in a variety of North Carolina settings so that through these activities, NC Extension agents and stakeholders will become more knowledgeable about IPM and develop skill sets to be able to implement sound IPM practices; and 3) Offer tools that will improve Pest Monitoring and Pest Forecasting protocols for pests of importance to NC Agronomic and Specialty Crops and enable enhanced searching and output features on the IPM Portal.

Date: 09/01/18 - 8/31/22
Amount: $499,250.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Specific Objectives: 1) Measure the impact of RIB and structured corn refuge on H. zea pupal depth survival and adult flight parameters in corn; 2) Describe the role of cotton and soybean as a reservoir for H. zea Bt resistance alleles; 3) Propose a refined model of evolution of resistance for H. zea using these data.


View all grants 

Groups