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John Havlin

Professor

Williams Hall 2222

Publications

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Grants

Date: 03/01/17 - 2/28/18
Amount: $5,000.00
Funding Agencies: NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services

Sufficient N supply to wine grape plants especially during veraison is required to support optimum grape yield, fruit quality, and desired flavors in the final wine product. Due to the potential for excessive vine vigor and disease pressure associated with soil applied N, wines are often N deficient during veraison, reducing concentrations of yeast assimilable N (YAN) in harvested grape and grape must. Field studies will be conducted with two varieties at Shelton Vineyards to evaluate late-season (pre-veraison) foliar N and ABA application effects on foliar and grape N concentration, in addition to grape quality components including pH, total acidity, brix, malic acid, and YAN.

Date: 03/01/15 - 12/31/16
Amount: $10,000.00
Funding Agencies: NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services

Sufficient nitrogen (N)supply to wine grape plants especially during veraison is required to support optimum grape yield, fruit quality, and desired flavors in the final wine product. Due to the potential for excessive vine vigor and disease pressure associated with soil applied N, wines are often N deficient during veraison, reducing concentrations of yeast assimilable N (YAN) in harvested grape and grape must. Field studies will be conducted to evaluate late-season (pre-veraison) foliar N application effects on foliar and grape N concentration, in addition to selected grape quality components (pH, total acidity (TA), Brix, Malic acid, and YAN).

Date: 09/01/10 - 8/31/15
Amount: $746,302.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)

Excessive grape vine vigor as a result of environmental factors like rainfall, climate and soils is a significant concern to the Eastern wine grape industry. Wine grape producers have struggled with finding a reasonable approach to balance vine vigor management, crop yield and wine quality. Extensive research conducted in peaches in North Carolina demonstrated that peach tree growth and yield can be manipulated by managing herbicide strip width and irrigation. Additional research in peach orchards has shown that weed competition for moisture in the weeks leading up to harvest reduce fruit size. Clearly the objectives of peach production differ from wine grape production, however results from the peach studies offer insight to the possibility of easily implemented management practices having desirable effects on wine grape production. Preliminary research in North Carolina has demonstrated that weed competition and herbicide strip width can influence grape vine growth and yield.

Date: 12/01/09 - 11/30/13
Amount: $95,000.00
Funding Agencies: United States - Israel Binational Agricultural Research & Development Fund (BARD)

Grapes are grown under a wide range of natural water (and climate) regimes because of their high value and desirability for many cultures throughout the world. As such, vineyard management systems must be highly diverse and locally adapted. The total amount of water available to the grape vines, naturally or through irrigation, is greatly influenced by practices in the inter-row. In arid regions such as Israel, the inter-row is typically maintained with a bare soil surface. Bare soil allows direct soil water evaporation, a net loss of water that is unnecessary for grape production and undesirable under water-limited conditions. In vineyards where annual water scarcity is not a concern such as the Southeastern U.S., the inter-rows are typically maintained with grassed surfaces. Grass transpires soil water throughout its growth cycle. This is beneficial during periods under excess water, but can be detrimental to water availability during periods when rainfall is scarce, particularly during flowering. Growers using grassed inter-rows risk significant yield loss when soil water availability fails to meet early season grape vine demand. The overarching goal of this project is to improve understanding of vineyard water management related to the critical inter-row zone. Experiments will be conducted in both moist temperate and arid regions in order to address inter-row water use under high and low water availability conditions. The intended outcome from both locations is to develop a low-input modeling tool that can be used to adapt local vineyard water management strategies (i.e. surface cover conditions) for the inter-row without the need for extensive instrumentation. Measurements will directly address practices in the Southeastern U.S. and Israel. In the Southeastern U.S. (North Carolina), specific practices for grass and bare soil inter-row management will be tested in order to develop an appropriate inter-row cover strategy to meet grape vine water needs. The work will allow fundamental improvement in a fledgling wine-grape industry. In Israel (Arad Valley), irrigation methods (above ground vs. buried or mulched drip lines) will be tested in order to estimate the potential water conservation in water management of wine-grape vineyards through minimization of soil evaporation. In view of the continuously decreasing amounts of available fresh water in the region, this work will advance water conservation practices in vineyards.

Date: 03/01/11 - 2/28/13
Amount: $40,000.00
Funding Agencies: Golden Leaf Foundation

Spurred on by the demands of a burgeoning craft brewing industry, a strong public interest in locally grown ingredients, and a significant open-market price for hops (Humulus lupulus), farmers are experimenting with hops as an alternative income source. Over the past three years, growers across North Carolina have established hop yards and successfully sold their product to local craft breweries. These growers are working with information published for the Pacific Northwest hops industry, without the benefit of objective recommendations from recognized local sources with specific expertise in the regional climate and soil characteristics. The objective of this project is to help North Carolina growers identify the best performing hop cultivars, promising geographic areas for hops production, and the key issues related to nutrition, disease, and pest control. Local market conditions and production costs will also be addressed. We will accomplish this goal by continuing the research at the Raleigh experimental site while focusing our efforts on key agronomic issues in the Mountains. This proposal seeks to continue research funded during the 2010 Golden Leaf Open Grants Program cycle.

Date: 09/01/10 - 12/31/12
Amount: $31,064.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)

North Carolina State University, a member institution in the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (Great Plains IDEA) and partner in the University Passport Program, will develop and implement activities to assist in the development of new academic programs to provide educational opportunities to military personnel, dependents and civilians who provide support to military families.

Date: 07/15/07 - 6/30/12
Amount: $105,603.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)

Enhanced education for agricultural and environmental professionals is needed to address increasingly complex agricultural, environmental, and ecological issues. The proposed regional distance education program will help place-bound students and professionals obtain training in science, education, and policy related to agriculture and related disciplines. While many colleges and universities in the Southern region offer distance education courses and programs, the proposed project will focused on three primary goals: 1) establish an operating structure to delivery graduate degrees throughout the southern region through distance education, 2) offer regional based graduate degrees in agricultural education and poultry science, and 3) conduct market surveys to determine additional priority graduate degree programs to offer following completion of the grant. The proposed program will create a unique opportunity for extension educators and other professionals to enhance professional skills and expertise essential to protecting the quality of our natural resources while sustaining economic opportunities. The program builds human capacity and knowledge in agriculture and the environment essential to sustaining healthy communities and the nation.

Date: 01/01/09 - 12/31/11
Amount: $38,700.00
Funding Agencies: NC Department of Commerce

A research project entitled "Survey of Vitis Vinifera Nutrient Status in NC" has been conducted in cooperation between NC State University (John Havlin and Sara Spayd) and NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Service (David Hardy). Results from field surveys evaluating the nutrient status in common vinifera varieties grown in the Piedmont and Mountain regions of NC indicated potential responses to P, K, B, and lime. Although survey data will be collected from several vineyards where only one year of data have been collected (2006-08 project), nutrient response studies will be conducted (2009-11). In these studies, wine grape growth response to soil applied lime, P, and K, and foliar applied B will be monitored. These data will assist in verifying the accuracy of the nutrient sufficiency guidelines developed from the 2006-08 studies and to begin development of nutrient response recommendations.

Date: 09/29/04 - 9/30/10
Amount: $137,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)

North Carolina developed the Phosphorus Loss Assessment Tool (PLAT) to quantify soluble and particulate phosphorus (P) transport in agricultural fields to surface and ground waters. While PLAT is based on substantial supporting science, the scientific basis for quantifying soluble P transport or leaching to subsurface water and for assessing the effects of riparian buffer practices on subsurface P loss are not well established. Additional field and laboratory research are needed to provide supportive data on the specific processes and factors controlling P losses by subsurface P transport from the field to subsurface and surface waters. These data will be used to revise PLAT to improve the accuracy in estimating P transport processes in agricultural fields.

Date: 01/01/06 - 6/30/09
Amount: $40,300.00
Funding Agencies: NC Department of Commerce

Field studies will be conducted to evaluate the nutrient status in common red and white vinifera varieties grown in the Piedmont and Mountain regions of NC. Nutrient concentration ranges in both leaf petiole and blade samples will be established, as well as the temporal changes in nutrient concentrations. Nutrient levels in tissues will be compared to soil test data collected from similar sampling areas within a vineyard. In addition, baseline reflectance data will be collected and related to tissue nutrient levels. These preliminary survey data are essential to guide vinifera management decisions and to identify future nutrient management research directions and priorities.


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