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Kofi Boone

Professor

Kamphoefner Hall A204

Publications

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Grants

Date: 07/25/19 - 4/25/21
Amount: $90,000.00
Funding Agencies: NC Community Foundation

The requested funding will advance recovery and rebuilding activities within two Lumberton Floodprint focus areas: 1) Meadow Branch Floodway Restoration adjacent to the Best Drive neighborhood, and 2) Repurposing the Scottish Meatpacking Plant property into an environmental outreach and education amenity associated with the Lumber River State Park and/or NC Wildlife Resource Commission. The funding will support research, engagement, design, and communication activities including, but not limited to: [1] a minimum of three (3) community workshops to elicit participation and input from neighborhood residents and two (2) meetings with city council/staff; [2] hydrologic modeling and development of schematic restoration concepts for Meadow Branch; [3] development of schematic design alternatives for both project areas to be used by the city as evidence/leverage for seeking larger implementation grants and to inform respective requests for proposals (RFPs); and [4] continued evaluation of issues and opportunities related to both Hurricane Matthew and Hurricane Florence impacts (i.e., FEMA flood map updates, incorporation of new property acquisition data, etc.), including associated updates and revisions to the Lumberton Floodprint.

Date: 01/01/20 - 6/30/20
Amount: $12,134.00
Funding Agencies: North Carolina Botanical Garden Foundation

With growing national interest in empowering the voices, thinking, and impact of indigenous communities on the built environment, there is a need for projects that center indigenous voices in the planning process. We think this will offer an excellent opportunity to advance the goals of the partners while also contributing to scholarship and education in culturally competent community engagement approaches. The project occupies a unique overlap between campus and community design, community engagement, cultural competency, and vision planning.

Date: 07/01/18 - 6/30/19
Amount: $19,729.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Homeland Security (DHS)

With a focus on developing innovative, resilient planning and design strategies for flood-prone communities in North Carolina, the principles that guide the proposed project are to build capacity, extend the reach, and transfer knowledge of existing and novel research and best practices related to landscape planning, design, and management strategies, tools, policies, and procedures. This project represents a collaborative effort with the Hurricane Matthew Disaster Recovery and Resilience Initiative (HMDRRI) to implement and operationalize broader open space concepts developed in the summer of 2017, through what is referred to as the Homeplace document. The primary goal of the project is to assist in the development of design strategies that support the long-term function, health, and vitality of communities located in an historically flood-prone North Carolina community, Lumberton. The proposed project will contribute to the ongoing HMDRRI work by developing an open space planning, design, and management framework for public lands that: 1) were directly impacted by Hurricane Matthew’s floodwaters, 2) are within the 100-year floodplain (and possibly the 500 year), and/or 3) adjoin or are near floodplains, riverine systems, and/or existing parklands.

Date: 05/10/18 - 12/28/18
Amount: $25,000.00
Funding Agencies: NC Community Foundation

With a focus on developing innovative, resilient planning and design strategies for flood-prone communities in North Carolina, the principles that guide the proposed project are to build capacity, extend the reach, and transfer knowledge of existing and novel research and best practices related to landscape planning, design, and management strategies, tools, policies, and procedures. This project represents a collaborative effort with the Hurricane Matthew Disaster Recovery and Resilience Initiative (HMDRRI) to implement and operationalize broader open space concepts developed in the summer of 2017, through what is referred to as the Homeplace document. The primary goal of the project is to assist in the development of design strategies that support the long-term function, health, and vitality of communities located in an historically flood-prone North Carolina community, Lumberton. The proposed project will contribute to the ongoing HMDRRI work by developing an open space planning, design, and management framework for public lands that: 1) were directly impacted by Hurricane Matthew’s floodwaters, 2) are within the 100-year floodplain (and possibly the 500 year), and/or 3) adjoin or are near floodplains, riverine systems, and/or existing parklands.

Date: 04/17/17 - 6/15/17
Amount: $50,000.00
Funding Agencies: UNC - UNC Chapel Hill

The overarching goal of the project is to assist in the development of design strategies that support the long-term function, health, and vitality of communities located in historically flood-prone North Carolina communities. The proposed project will contribute to the ongoing Hurricane Matthew Disaster Recovery and Resilience Initiative (HMDRRI) work by developing design and planning recommendations for neighborhood and housing (re)construction activities associated with post-Matthew recovery efforts. The project team will consider hazard-related issues facing this region, including the potential impacts of flooding, development patterns, and population trends. The project will be guided by architectural and landscape architectural approaches to development, conservation, and management practices and uses.

Date: 07/01/15 - 12/31/16
Amount: $10,127.00
Funding Agencies: William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust

This community-based participatory research and training project will focus on developing community capacity to address environmental equity issues and build more sustainable communities. Through partnership between community members and researchers at Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this project will develop 1) community capacity to address environmental injustices and participate in local decision-making around redevelopment and green infrastructure projects, and 2) identify best practices for incorporating environmental equity into local decision-making around economic redevelopment projects. The project partners will use community-based participatory research methods to provide community members with tools, training, and opportunities to engage in planning activities to promote positive environmental features and economic development efforts in their neighborhoods while also mitigating any potential unintended consequences.

Date: 07/01/15 - 6/30/16
Amount: $10,000.00
Funding Agencies: NCSU Office of Extension & Engagement & Economic Development

DIY (Do It Yourself) Cartography will curate diverse historical perspectives and facilitate creative placemaking by connecting citizens to a deeper understanding of the city and its urban environments. Imagined as an online archive and series of site specific installations, DIY Cartography will engage audiences in experiencing a rich understanding of Raleigh’s alive and evolving history. It will also offer the opportunity to contribute to that history by expanding the narratives currently marked by the Highway Historical Markers. Current markers memorialize a spectrum of events, places, and people commemorating important themes in our local, regional, and national heritage. Many of the values of the city can be inferred by what has been marked, as well as what and who has not. Too often the official history of a place, its people, and its events is curated by a select few in support of narrow agendas. DIY Cartography seeks to challenge the construction of an official top-down history through an open and participatory platform. As we find ourselves at a moment of remarkable growth and redevelopment, this project will offer alternative methods to visualize, capture and integrate contemporary and historic voices into a rich discourse on community, culture and urban living.

Date: 09/21/10 - 4/30/13
Amount: $103,498.00
Funding Agencies: NC Dept. of Natural & Cultural Resources formerly NC Dept of Env. & Natural Resources (DENR)

The Black Creek watershed is a 3.2 square mile area in Cary, NC, that drains to Lake Crabtree and Crabtree Creek, in the Neuse River Basin. The watershed is typical of a developed Piedmont watershed with a hilly terrain, residential subdivisions, a handful of schools, two town parks, and the supporting commercial properties such as shopping centers and gas stations. Completely urbanized, with more than 32% impervious surface, the Black Creek watershed also contains the very popular Black Creek Greenway, running alongside the main stem and one of its major tributaries. The creek is 303(d) listed as impaired due to biological integrity. NCSU has been working in the watershed for 3 years on watershed planning, developing and building relationships with the stakeholders through the Black Creek Watershed Association, who are in support of this grant proposal. A recent watershed assessment is showing that the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff is likely the main stressor to aquatic life. This project will engage watershed stakeholders in a ?disconnection campaign? to begin the process of reducing stormwater runoff volume and velocity. The effort will involve installing numerous backyard and community BMPs, while educating them on the practices of pollution prevention practices. A geodatabase will be used to select focus sites, and community workshops will educate and recruit landowners for applying "disconnection" practices. A watershed survey will be conducted to determine resident preferences for stormwater management and willingness to pay for various ecological services and stormwater practices. The project will demonstrate a method for engaging the community in disconnecting urban stormwater runoff conveyances and promoting infiltration practices to restore an impaired piedmont stream, Black Creek. In addition, the team will work with the Town of Cary and community to develop a sustainable financing plan to implement projects beyond the life of the CWMTF grant.

Date: 08/01/08 - 4/30/11
Amount: $53,179.00
Funding Agencies: Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation

The College of Design?s Downtown Design Studio, working in conjunction with the NC Cooperative Extension Service, NC A&T State University, and officials and staff of the /City of Kannapolis, will identify strategies to stabilize Kannapolis? low-income distressed neighborhoods. They will enable residents to participate in discussions that aim to shape the future of their neighborhoods, as well as to take advantage of opportunities created by the North Carolina Research Campus and other economic growth potentials in the area. The main objectives of this project are to provide the City of Kannapolis with facilitation services and community development expertise; to develop a needs assessment and an action plan; and to conduct a neighborhood charette to examine and define the physical planning and urban design project recommended in the action plan.

Date: 11/01/08 - 3/31/11
Amount: $89,928.00
Funding Agencies: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

NEMO, Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials is a nationally recognized outreach program directed at local land use decision makers and addressing the relationship of land use to natural resource protection through a focus on natural resource based planning and using GIS as a tool to of education. The NC NEMO team is a multi-agency, multi-university team consisting of the various layers of expertise needed to develop and implement NEMO in NC. Much data are available on water quality and land use in NC. The NCNEMO model is the vehicle needed to bring this information to the public decision makers in a simple, easy to understand format. The project team will develop a Community Resource Inventory (an atlas and corresponding information) along with the curriculum required to not only understand the data but understand what to do with it and how to make land use decisions based on it, resulting in natural resource based planning. The project will also increase the capacity of a community to better cope with growth and development. The project will result in a curriculum and training opportunity for natural resource professionals which will allow them to help communities who wish to understand and embark on natural resource based planning. The web-based Community Resource Inventory will be a source of instruction as well as information, and will tie into NC?s already robust GIS resources on the internet.


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